FIJIAN Facts & Figures

Size: 7,056 square miles

Population: 849,000

Capital:  Suva

Currency: Fijian dollar

Weather / Climate:

Fiji, endowed with forest, mineral, and fish resources, is one of the more developed of the Pacific island economies, though still with a large subsistence sector. Natural resources include timber, fish, gold, copper, offshore oil and hydropower. Fiji experienced a period of rapid growth in the 1960s and 1970s but stagnated in the 1980s. The coup of 1987 caused further contraction.

Economic liberalization in the years following the coup created a boom in the garment industry and a steady growth rate despite growing uncertainty of land tenure in the sugar industry. The expiration of leases for sugar cane farmers (along with reduced farm and factory efficiency) has led to a decline in sugar production despite a subsidized price. Subsidies for sugar have been provided by the EU and Fiji has been the second largest beneficiary after Mauritius.

Urbanization and expansion in the service sector have contributed to recent GDP growth. Sugar exports and a rapidly growing tourist industry — with 430,800 tourists in 2003[50] and increasing in the subsequent years — are the major sources of foreign exchange. Fiji is highly dependent on tourism for revenue. Sugar processing makes up one-third of industrial activity. Long-term problems include low investment and uncertain property rights. The political turmoil in Fiji has had a severe impact on the economy, which shrank by 2.8% in 2000 and grew by only 1% in 2001.

The tourism sector recovered quickly, however, with visitor arrivals reaching pre-coup levels again during 2002, which has since resulted in a modest economic recovery. This recovery continued into 2003 and 2004 but grew by 1.7% in 2005 and grew by 2.0% in 2006. Although inflation is low, the policy indicator rate of the Reserve Bank of Fiji was raised by 1% to 3.25% in February 2006 due to fears of excessive consumption financed by debt. Lower interest rates have so far not produced greater investment for exports.

Taken from:www.wikipedia.com

FIJIAN languages

Fiji has three official languages under the 1997 constitution; English, Fijian and Hindustani. Fijian is a spoken either as a first or second language by indigenous Fijians who make up around 54% of the population. Fijians of Indian descent make up a further 37%, mainly speaking Hindustani (Urdu and Hindi), whose local variant is known as Fiji Hindi. English, a remnant of British colonial rule over the islands, was the sole official language until 1997 and is widely used in government, business, and education as a lingua franca; considerable business is also done in Fijian, especially away from larger town centers.

A small number of other indigenous East Fijian and West Fijian regional languages are spoken on the islands, standard Fijian belonging to the East Fijian group. Rotuman and Chinese are also spoken by immigrant populations.

Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Fiji

FIJIAN people

Indigenous Fijians, the native inhabitants of Fiji, are a mixture of Polynesian and Melanesian, resulting from the original migrations to the South Pacific many centuries ago. The Indo-Fijian population has grown rapidly from the 61,000 workers brought from India between 1879 and 1916 to work in the sugarcane fields, who later on ended up leasing/owning the sugar cane plantations. Thousands more Indians migrated voluntarily in the 1920s and 1930s and formed the core of Fiji's business class.

In 1977 The Economist reported that ethnic Fijians were a minority of 255,000, in a total population of 600,000 of which fully half were of Indian descent, with the remainder Chinese, European and of mixed ancestry.[1]

The native Fijians live throughout the country, while the Indo-Fijians reside primarily near the urban centers and in the cane-producing areas of the two main islands. Nearly all of the indigenous Fijians are Christian, with some two-thirds being Methodist. Some 77 percent of the Indo-Fijians are Hindu, with a further 16 percent being Muslim and 6 percent Christian. There are also a few Sikhs.

A national census is supposed to be conducted every ten years. The last was held in 1996, but the census intended for 2006 has been postponed till 2007. Finance Minister Ratu Jone Kubuabola announced on 27 October 2005 that the Cabinet had decided that it would not be in the country's interest to have a census and a general election in the same year. "Peoples’ focus on the elections could have an impact on their cooperation with census officials," he said. The Statistics Office supported Kubuabola's announcement, saying that public interest in the general election would likely distract people's attention from the census, making it problematic to conduct.

Population:827,900

Age structure:
0-14 years: 33% (male 141,779; female 136,212)
15-64 years: 63% (male 263,127; female 262,686)
65 years and over: 4% (male 13,405; female 15,285) (2000 est.)

Population growth rate:1.40% (2006 est.)

Birth rate:23.48 births/1,000 population (2000 est.)

Death rate:5.78 deaths/1,000 population (2000 est.)

Net migration rate:-3.6 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2000 est.)

Sex ratio:
at birth: 1.05 male(s)/female
under 15 years: 1.04 male(s)/female
15-64 years: 1 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 0.88 male(s)/female
total population: 1.01 male(s)/female (2000 est.)

Infant mortality rate:14.45 deaths/1,000 live births (2000 estimate)

Life expectancy at birth:
total population: 67.94 years
male: 65.54 years
female: 70.45 years (2000 est.)

Total fertility rate:2.89 children born/woman (2000 est.) 2.65 children born/woman (2010 est.)

Nationality:
noun: Fijian(s)
adjective: Fijian

Ethnic groups:Indigenous Fijian 57.25% (predominantly Melanesian with a Polynesian admixture), Indo-Fijian 37.64%, European, other Pacific Islanders, Chinese in Fiji, and other 5.11%.

Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Fiji

FIJIAN food

The cuisine of Fiji is very complex and reflects culinary influence of different cultures.

The Dutch introduced the local population to the sea cucumbers. The British brought with them the cattle and some exotic plants & fruits from Africa and the Americas. Indian cuisine developed in this country because of the Indian slaves that the British brought here to work on the sugar plantations. It is because of the Indian influence that Fiji cuisine uses many different spices and knows how to cultivate and combine the pulses.

Present day Fiji cuisine is a great mixture of Polynesian, Indian, Melanesian, Chinese and Western cuisine. Some of the most used ingredients in Fiji cuisine are yam, breadfruit, cassava, taro root (dalo) and leaves (rourou). Beef, poultry, pork and seafood are an integral part of Fijian food.

Most of salads, appetizer, soups or beverages are essential. They are prepared with the commonly found fruits such as guava, mango, bananas and pineapple. Alongside with the coconut milk, these fruits can be used to prepare either sweet or salty and spicy dishes.

Generally, a Fijian main course is prepared using meat, poultry garnished with cassava, ortaro and boiled taro leaves. Spices such as ginger, garlic, turmeric, fenugreek, coriander, cumin, Indian-Fiji curries and chilies are added to increase the flavor of any dish.

Fijicuisine uses elements from various cooking traditions borrowed from their neighbors and developed from their own traditional dishes. While there are no specific or unique preparation methods for Fiji cooking, attention to detail is important in the Fiji cuisine. Using the right amount of spices for example is essential - either for spicing up the taste or for coloring the dish. The Fiji cuisine needs diverse cooking equipment set in order to produce the most sophisticated dishes.

The diversity of vegetables and cereals found in Fiji is also noticed in the delicious dishes belonging to their cuisine. The visual attractiveness of the dish is also vital and a balance between colors and proportion differentiates. Each traditional dish has a special cooking method, which is more or less general in all of Fiji's regions. Meat is one of the main elements of most Fiji dishes and cured and smoked hams are often parts of delicious dishes.

The festivals are the occasions to prepare the delicacies of Fijian cuisine. Specific local dishes are served during these festivals. Kokoda, marinated and steamed fish in lime and coconut cream, is one of the delicacies.

Kassaua is another dish served mostly during the festivals. It is made from boiled or baked tapioca and cooked with coconut and mashed bananas with cream. Besides these dishes, festivals are the greatest opportunity for a meat dish made after special recipes and involving many exotic ingredients such as the Indian curry. The Fijians love this kind of food very hot and most of the time served with breadfruit and wine.

Taken from www.gowealthy.com

Places to go in FIJI

 

 

Doing business in FIJI

Fiji, endowed with forest, mineral, and fish resources, is one of the more developed of the Pacific island economies, though still with a large subsistence sector. Natural resources include timber, fish, gold, copper, offshore oil and hydropower. Fiji experienced a period of rapid growth in the 1960s and 1970s but stagnated in the 1980s. The coup of 1987 caused further contraction.

Economic liberalization in the years following the coup created a boom in the garment industry and a steady growth rate despite growing uncertainty of land tenure in the sugar industry. The expiration of leases for sugar cane farmers (along with reduced farm and factory efficiency) has led to a decline in sugar production despite a subsidized price. Subsidies for sugar have been provided by the EU and Fiji has been the second largest beneficiary after Mauritius.

Urbanization and expansion in the service sector have contributed to recent GDP growth. Sugar exports and a rapidly growing tourist industry — with 430,800 tourists in 2003[50] and increasing in the subsequent years — are the major sources of foreign exchange. Fiji is highly dependent on tourism for revenue. Sugar processing makes up one-third of industrial activity. Long-term problems include low investment and uncertain property rights. The political turmoil in Fiji has had a severe impact on the economy, which shrank by 2.8% in 2000 and grew by only 1% in 2001.

The tourism sector recovered quickly, however, with visitor arrivals reaching pre-coup levels again during 2002, which has since resulted in a modest economic recovery. This recovery continued into 2003 and 2004 but grew by 1.7% in 2005 and grew by 2.0% in 2006. Although inflation is low, the policy indicator rate of the Reserve Bank of Fiji was raised by 1% to 3.25% in February 2006 due to fears of excessive consumption financed by debt. Lower interest rates have so far not produced greater investment for exports.

However, there has been a housing boom from declining commercial mortgage rates. The tallest building in Fiji is the fourteen-storey Reserve Bank of Fiji Building in Suva, which was inaugurated in 1984. The Suva Central Commercial Centre, which opened in November 2005, was planned to outrank the Reserve Bank building at seventeen stories, but last-minute design changes made sure that the Reserve Bank building remains the tallest.

Trade and investment with Fiji has been criticized due to the country's military dictatorship.[51] In 2008, Fiji's interim Prime Minister and coup leader Frank Bainimarama announced election delays and that it would pull out of the Pacific Islands Forum in Niue, where Bainimarama would have met with Australian Prime MinisterKevin Rudd and New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark.[52]

The South Pacific Stock Exchange (SPSE) is the only licensed securities exchange in Fiji and is based in Suva. Its vision is to become a regional exchange.

Taken from wikipedia

FIJI: useful links

http://www.fijime.com/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-14919067

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/fiji

http://www.fiji.gov.fj

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